Great Careers for Introverts

Great Careers for Introverts

Greeting fellow shut-ins. As an introvert one of the most difficult areas to navigate through for me was the career field. Its intimidating, confusing, and just down right unforgiving if gone about in the wrong way. However, I’m here to help with the process. Having been stuck in job after job where I never felt right for the role, I have developed a process to narrow down career options for those who are not exactly the most outgoing by nature.
First things first, let’s get one thing clear. There’s a common misconception that introverts are not good with people. WRONG! By definition, Introverts are defined as shy, reticent people. Reticent meaning not forthcoming with one’s thoughts or feelings. None of these things are anything to be ashamed about. Be proud of the fact that you are who you are and you’re a rare find in a society where oversharing is the standard.
If you’re anything like I was (and kinda still am), a lover of alone time, a little clueless as to what this meant for me professionally. I mean after all, society shows as a very glamorous exaggerated idea of careers and workplace relationships. Relationships where you will be going out for cocktails every friday and develop lasting friendships with your fellow members of your jobs party planning committee. All of which are probably though up by the media who caters to an extroverted viewerships. So if you’re not as outgoing as the Don Drapers of the world or have the ass to hip ratio of a Kardashian, there’s still hope for you yet.
For my creative loners out there, a great move for you to create might be graphic design. I love this option for those who love to draw and edit film and video. Getting your Bachelors in this field gives you loads of options. From animation to Public Relations Managers. An added bonus is you can work your way towards being your own boss creating your own hours and working projects of your choosing. You can create like Stan Lee or manage and make power moves like Olivia Pope.
If sciences is your calling, working in a lab environment might be a good fit for you. You’ll more than likely not be completely alone in the laboratory, but your interaction with the outside world will be limited.If you’re willing to put in the work academically, most require a B.S. in a related field and if you’re willing to work the hours, you can earn a decent living. Just keep in mind, manufacturing facilities are a 24/7, 365 day a year industry. A lot of higher paying lab work can have 12 hour shifts. The great thing about Lab jobs is that advancement is a definite possibility if you are able to stick around and increase your knowledge of the products you’re working with.Having a knack for kissing boss ass comes in handing and not mention, interest in the industry is a plus. If you are a creature of habit, I’d say go for it. This career without much difference in day to day activity. If you enjoy the excitement of unexpectant daily job activity then you may feel a bit unfulfilled here. Which brings me to my next recommendation if you are on the marker for a constantly changing yet rewarding science job. Try Archaeology. If you are a lover of working outside, have excellent hand-eye coordination and an affinity for history then bulls-eye! Archaeologist can work alone or in groups with others at very cool examination sites. Most archaeologists are employed by musiesmes, you might also find work with government agencies or private organizations. The plus side of all your hard work and digging is travelling to place and living among the locals.
There are a lot of introverts out there who absolutely love books and science. For this reason, the medical field attracts a lot of us . It’s a lucrative careers with plenty of prestige and you’re not constantly being tempted with a lack of social life. This is because working in a public capacity for years and years, you start to look forward to being alone with your hobbies and interests of your own. The medical field is constantly growing and is always looking for new talent; But lets face it, 100 years of school, 100k worth of student loan debt, the promise of blood on a daily basis and the fact that you might kill a person accidentally brings me to my next option. A Pharmacist. While you’ll have a pretty hefty 8 years for a Pharm-D license, this is a great career for those who are understand chemical bonds a whole lot better than the dreaded people or relationship bonds. The pay for earning your Pharm-D is unmatched for an undergrad. At a staggering $114k/year with limited people interaction, thats comparable to some M.D’s salary minus the blood. Pharmacists work in hospitals, drugstore and many even open their operations and become their own boos. Just keep in mind, they are sued quite often. But more money more problems, right!

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